Tuesday, July 7, 2015

Philadelphia's Magic Gardens

Robin loves Philadelphia. When she was four years old, I used to take her to Philadelphia Orchestra children's concerts at the Academy of Music and usually we would have to walk along some back streets to get back to the car. By then, she would be clutching her bag of Skittles that was the bribe that would get her to willingly come along.

She and Alex had considered taking a Septa train to Philly from Newark DE, but they slept in. I volunteered to drive them up there. Robin wanted to show Alex some of the famous sights of Philly, but also to see some places that she wanted to see that she had read about. One of them was the Magic Gardens which is on South Street between 10th and 11th streets.




The museum is a building that was covered in mosaics by the artist Isaiah Zagar.


The entry fee is $7 with discounts for students and seniors. Every room is covered in mosaics and you wander from room to room.













Isaiah also purchased the two vacant lots next door and created an outdoor labyrinth of mosaics that you wander through, cross bridges and up and down stairs.






These reminded me of the Zoastran Fire Temple at Ani in Turkey. Every time I revisit that blog I am amazed by the place.










Robin at the top of a set of steps.




A photo of a photo of the artist.


I found it all a bit overwhelming visually. My eyes and mind find it difficult to focus and concentrate but perhaps that is the idea. In some ways I prefer this photo to the others because it is simpler. It really is a very unusual museum and well worth visiting.



We had a cheese steak for lunch after walking past Independence Hall. There was no point in visiting the Liberty Bell or the Hall since the queues in Summer are very long.


Alex just could not get that Pledge of Allegiance pose correct.



We then went to my favourite restaurant in Philly called Monks. We had some refreshing Belgian beer and some frites and then walked back to the car down our favourite street in Philly called Smedley Street. It is closed to traffic and is a refuge from the hustle and bustle of the big city.

There was yet another long nap when we got home.


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